How Long Does a Credit Dispute Take?

If you’ve noticed information or accounts that dong belong to your on your credit, you’ve probably filed a dispute to have the inaccurate or incorrect information removed from your credit report. So, how long does it take the credit reporting bureaus to complete a credit dispute? We will answer this question in much detail below.

How Long Does a Credit Dispute Take?

Under Federal Law, the credit reporting bureaus are required to resolve credit disputes within 30 days. That said, most credit disputes are resolved within 10 to 14 business days. The length of time it takes to resolve a disputes depends on how responsive the lender or creditor is in replying to the credit reporting bureaus to resolve the dispute.

Typically, when a person believes that there is incorrect or inaccurate information his credit report, he or she can file a dispute with the credit reporting bureaus to have the information corrected or removed from his credit report.

That said, you must contact the credit reporting displaying the incorrect or inaccurate information. For example, if a collection account that does not belong to you appears on your Experian Credit Report, you must contact Experian and dispute the collection account with to have it removed. You can file a dispute with any one of three major credit reporting bureaus (Experian, Transunion, and Equifax) online.

Upon filing a dispute, the credit reporting bureau you filed a dispute with will contact the creditor or agency furnishing the information to conduct an investigation to determine the accuracy of the information provided.

If, after the investigation, the credit reporting bureau determines that the information is incorrect, it will remove the information from your credit report. However, if it determines that the information is correct and valid, it will deny your credit dispute and keep displaying the information on your credit report.

It would help if you kept in mind that the credit reporting bureaus will only remove inaccurate information from your credit report. So, if something like a delinquent account or collection account does in fact belong to you, the credit reporting bureau will not remove it fr from your credit report.

Steps to File a Credit Dispute (Credit Dispute Process)

  1. Request a copy of your credit report – The first step that you must take before filing a dispute is to pull a copy of your credit report and review it. If you find any inaccurate information, you can proceed to dispute that information. You must be able to specify the exact information that’s incorrect on your credit report.

  2. Dispute the Incorrect Information – Once you know what information is incorrect, you should proceed to find the dispute center for the credit reporting bureau displaying the incorrect information. Once at the dispute center, fill in the requested information and thoroughly explain why the specific information on your credit report is incorrect. You should include any evidence that you have. Many of our visitors have experienced errors in their account status, account balance, missed payments, collection account, or the account should have been removed from their credit report. Regardless of the reason for the dispute, the process is the same.

  3. Submit Your Dispute – Once you’ve filled in all of the required information and indicated what information is incorrect, you should file your dispute with the credit reporting bureau reporting the incorrect information.

  4. Wait for the Credit Reporting Bureau to Investigate – After you’ve submitted your dispute, it usually takes between 10 to 14 business days for the credit reporting to investigate your dispute. The processing of your dispute should not take longer than 30 days because the credit bureaus are required by law to investigate and complete dispute processing within 30 days of you filing your dispute.

  5. Result Rendered – Once the credit reporting bureau completes its investigation, it will inform you of the results. If the investigation revealed that the information is inaccurate, it will be removed from your credit report. However, if the investigation reveals that the information is accurate, the disputed information will not be removed from your credit report. That said, if the party that furnished the information that you claim is inaccurate does not respond to the credit bureau, the credit bureau has the option to remove the information. Some states mandate that the information be removed if the furnisher of the information does not reply.

Summary of How a Credit Dispute Works

Whether you filed a credit dispute with Experian, Equifax, or Transunion, the process is very similar. You provide them with your personal information, you review a copy of your credit report and select specific information to be disputed. After you file a dispute, the credit reporting bureau will reach out to the provider of information to investigate whether the information is valid or wrong. If the information proves to be wrong, it will be removed from your credit file.

What Should You Do if Your Credit Dispute is Denied?

If your dispute is denied, but you believe that it was incorrectly denied, you have the option to resubmit your dispute. That said, you should submit additional evidence and/or information to prove that the information is indeed incorrect.

The initial dispute that you make is not investigated thoroughly and usually involves an agent of the credit reporting bureau contacting the party that furnished the information to confirm whether the information is accurate.

To have a more thorough dispute performed, you should contact the credit reporting bureau and escalate your dispute so that a more thorough dispute is conducted.

You should submit as much information that can help you case as possible. This will insure that you have the best chance at succeeding in your dispute.

If you are not familiar with the dispute process, you should explore the option of hiring a credit repair service to perform the dispute on your behalf. Credit repair services usually have aggressive employees who know the ins and outs of credit disputes and so they’ll offer you a better chance of successfully disputing and having the information removed from your credit report.

Check All Three of Your Credit Reports

You should check all three of your credit reports because some creditors and lenders only report to one or two of the credit reporting bureaus, so the information that each brueau may have may be different. So, check all three of your credit reports (Transunion, Experian, and Equifax) and dispute any information that’s inaccurate with credit reporting bureau reporting the information.

If several bureaus are reporting the same incorrect information, you have the option of contacting the creditor or furnisher of information and ask them to remove the information from all three credit reports. However, if that does not work, you must contact each of the credit reporting bureaus and ask them to remove the incorrect info.

For example, if a collection account that does not belong to you is reported to Experian and Transunion, you must file a dispute with both credit reporting bureaus to have the information removed.

All three credit reporting bureaus offer the option to dispute information for free online. If you do not wish to do so online, you have the option of calling them to dispute the information or to do so by mail. Disputing information online is the quickest way, while disputing via mail is the slowest way.

Credit Score Planet Frequently Asked Questions

1. Can disputing information on your credit report hurt your credit score?

No, disputing negative information on your credit report will not hurt your credit. However, if the negative information that you’ve disputed is removed, you could see an increase in your credit score.

2. Do you have to dispute with all three of the credit reporting bureaus?

You must file a dispute with every credit reporting bureau reporting incorrect information. Removing information from one of your credit files will not remove it from your credit file with another credit reporting bureau.

3. What happens if you win a credit dispute?

Usually, if you win a credit dispute, the information you’ve disputed is removed from your credit report.

4. What does it mean to dispute credit?

Disputing credit is filing a dispute with the credit reporting bureaus to remove information you’ve specified from your credit report. Usually, negative information, such as missed payments, collection accounts, charge offs, repossession, and other negative items are disputed.

5. How long do credit disputes take?

Credit disputes can take up to 30 days. However, many disputes are resolved in under two weeks.